GFI Outlets – An Understanding

You never know when something is going to happen at home. Electrical accidents can be deadly. With this in mind, you need to take steps to minimize the risks of a fatal accident. One of the best ways to solve this problem is by taking advantage of GFI or GFCI outlets. These outlets monitor the current coming from an appliance to ensure everything is working fluidly.

If the appliance is no longer getting the same current, the GFI outlet will recognize it and cut off the power. Using GFCI outlets helps protect your loved ones from electrocution at home. Before jumping ahead, it is pertinent to learn more about these outlets.

More About GFI Outlets

Homeowners and business owners should understand that these outlets are different than conventional electrical outlets. They look and function differently. In addition to this, GFI outlets have two buttons on the front. They’re labeled Test and Reset. By pushing the “Test” button, you will be able to test the outlet to make sure it is working as intended.

After the test has finished, you will need to push the reset button to make the outlet work again. The only problem with these outlets is that they will not last forever. They have a limited lifespan. You should avoid testing them too frequently since this will reduce their lifespan significantly.

It is best to install these outlets in rooms that have moisture, which includes bathrooms and kitchens. If your home is lacking GFI outlets, you’ll need to call Pittsburgh Electrician.

GFI Outlets FAQs

GFI and GFCI outlets are the same since they are Ground Fault Circuit Interrupters. These outlets help protect against electric shocks.

You should install GFI outlets in rooms that have moisture. The best rooms for GFI outlets include bathrooms and kitchens.

GFCI outlets compare the incoming current to the outgoing current. If there is a difference between the two, something is wrong. The outlet will cut the power to avoid potential issues.

If you cannot reset the outlet, something has gone wrong. It could be a ground-fault issue, or the GFCI might be malfunctioning. If you can’t figure out the problem, you should contact a professional electrician.

A ground fault happens when your hot wire touches your ground wire. As a result, excess energy will go to the circuit breaker. Then, it will cause the breaker to blow or trip.